What We're Reading 1/25/15

A few interesting articles from the last week…

Millennials want to live where?

The city center, suburbs or a rural area – where do most people born in the ’80s and 90’s want to live? A survey by the National Association of Home Builders Association says the ‘burbs by a big margin – 66% suburbs, 24% rural and 10% city. Possible implications for cities, planners, home owners BUT: “The survey results, though, could be skewed because they included only millennials who first answered that they bought a home within the past three years or intended to do so in the next three years. That excluded young people who intend to rent for many more years, which is a large and growing group.”

http://www.wsj.com/articles/millennials-prefer-single-family-homes-in-the-suburbs-1421896797

 

Applications to Drexel University fall 50%, by design 

On the difference between “hurdles and pause points”, honing the application pool to a manageable size and, interestingly, the importance of a university’s admissions department.

www.philly.com/philly/education/20150124_Drexel_s_freshman_applications_plunge_-_happily.html

 

Boredom boosts creativity?

I’m fascinated by the article but some of the terms are used imprecisely or too generously. Boredom or meditation? Creativity or self-discovery? Whatever, a good read just the same! Are you bored?

“Perhaps we should allow or—if it does not happen naturally—force ourselves to dip, periodically, into the lonely abyss of boredom, so that we might wrestle with perspective and our selves, and bring back some small insight greater than the results of an online quiz.”

www.nautil.us/blog/how-meaning-withdrawal-aka-boredom-can-boost-creativity

 

Or maybe you can go on a boring walk?

Take a midday walk, if your boss doesn’t expect you to work through lunch.

“On the afternoons after a lunchtime stroll, walkers said they felt considerably more enthusiastic, less tense, and generally more relaxed and able to cope than on afternoons when they hadn’t walked and even compared with their own moods from a morning before a walk.”

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/01/21/stressed-at-work-try-a-lunchtime-walk/